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Thanks Li-Hsuan for making a post on compact city and mixed used development (also thank you so much for the wishes). I completely agree with the idea of having a mixed used development for better liveable cities. The two cases (of Mumbai, India and New York, America) are the best examples to show two different types of development and their consequences.

Having a mixed used development help to develop a combination of land uses rather than concentrating on a single building. These lead to high density areas and creates different places to work, play or shop within residential areas.

Expected Beneficial Outcomes

Increased physical activity
Increased active transportation
Improved health outcomes
Reduced vehicle miles travelled

When these development is combined with transportation interventions like developing public transit infrastructure and sidewalks or trails, it automatically increase the physical activities. These help to improve bicycle and pedestrian transportation system.

Mixed used development also helps to reduce the infrastructure cost. There was a study in smart growth America in May 2013 where they examined 17 cities that used this mixed used development and in the result they concluded that municipalities saved 38 percentage of infrastructure cost like roads and sewers.

Connected Communities Improve Health, Environment, and Economies

In mixed used development you can find housing, restaurants, services, schools, cultural facilities, parks, and more facilities in the same area. This connectivity reduces the use of private vehicles and increase the importance of public transport, cycling and walking. Mexico City’s longest street, Avenida Insurgentes is the best example for it.

In my opinion mixed used development is strategy to reduce transportation costs, increase economic opportunity, household wealth, and mobility, and enhance neighbourhood cultural diversity.


References:

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School of Architecture
Planning and Landscape
Newcastle upon Tyne
Tyne and Wear, NE1 7RU

Tel: 0191 208 6509

Email: nicola.rutherford@ncl.ac.uk


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